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EasyJet To Remove A319 Back Row

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ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 08 May 22, 21:08Post
EasyJet plans to remove seats on some of its planes this summer, so that it can operate flights with fewer cabin crew.

The airline is battling staff shortages as it attempts to return to pre-pandemic levels of service.

By taking out the back row of seating on its A319 fleet, EasyJet said it will be able to fly with three cabin crew instead of four.

That would limit numbers on board to a maximum 150 passengers.

Read more: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-61370175

That's the extra row that meant they needed the double exit as well as the extra F/A?
My friend and I applied for airline jobs in Australia, but they didn't Qantas.
DXing 09 May 22, 00:11Post
Yep.....


ORO.CC.100 Number and composition of cabin crew

(a)

The number and composition of cabin crew shall be determined in accordance with 7.a of Annex IV to Regulation (EC) No 216/2008, taking into account operational factors or circumstances of the particular flight to be operated. At least one cabin crew member shall be assigned for the operation of aircraft with an MOPSC of more than 19 when carrying one or more passenger(s).

(b)

For the purpose of complying with (a), the minimum number of cabin crew shall be the greater of the following:

(1)

the number of cabin crew members established during the aircraft certification process in accordance with the applicable certification specifications, for the aircraft cabin configuration used by the operator; or

(2)

if the number under (1) has not been established, the number of cabin crew established during the aircraft certification process for the maximum certified passenger seating configuration reduced by 1 for every whole multiple of 50 passenger seats of the aircraft cabin configuration used by the operator falling below the maximum certified seating capacity; or

(3)

one cabin crew member for every 50, or fraction of 50, passenger seats installed on the same deck of the aircraft to be operated.


I read several different regulations about overwing exits but the EASA regs are pretty confusing. Some didn't make any sense.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
paul mcallister 09 May 22, 17:58Post
Only three cabin crew to cover 150 people does not seem enough to me.
The way some people behave on flights now, their is potential for cabin crew to be overwhelmed if a major incident broke out on board.
or a number of smaller incidents at the same time.
I admit that is worse case scenario, but it could and does happen.

There are any amount of other problems that can occur mid flight, and having only 3 cabin crew on board sounds like a bad idea.
DXing 13 May 22, 07:41Post
Think about the EMB and CRJ regional jets. They've been flying around for decades with only 1 flight attendant for up to 50 passengers. But I get where you are coming from. I still say social media is currently the biggest influencer of bad behaviors the human race has ever devised. As long as it's "All about ME!" no amount of FA's will be enough in certain circumstances.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
DXing 13 May 22, 12:22Post
one cabin crew member for every 50, or fraction of 50, passenger seats installed on the same deck of the aircraft to be operated.

Got me to thinking, was there a dedicated FA on the upper deck of BA 747's? That would be a separate deck with a fraction (20 seats) of 50. I never traveled on the upper deck of a 747 on any airline other than in the cockpit jump seat of a UA bird.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 16 May 22, 20:52Post
*Don't say it*

Though the legislation says 150, U2 will be going down to 144 pax on the A319 and deploying them on high freight demand routes, or so I'm told.

For those who don't know, there will follow a very concise history of the U2 A319 debacle:

Easyjet approached Airbus in 2003 with a proposal to build some high density A319s. Various teams went away and priced up their requests and it came back that they would be buying A320s with 24 less seats and it really wasn't advisable to go for such a radically altered product that would actually perform worse in every field, other than CASM on some very niche routes. The director in charge went back to their board and proposed that they bought A320s instead as what they were ordering was essentially an off the shelf A320 modified into a smaller aircraft. One very senior figure at easyjet was having none of this, and so the painful process of modifying supply chains,
and some actual components, began. On a personal note, I always recall new additions to the team who spotted the obvious flaws in this idea impressing me. It was something of a litmus test for spotting talented people.

Fast forward to 2008 and BA have cancelled their franchise deal for bucket and spade ops with the struggling GB Airways. U2 are short on capacity and their refreshed senior management snap up GBL, acquiring a number of in-service A320s in the process. Immediately U2's bean counters are very impressed with their new toys and the revenue they can bring in, especially on their high demand routes that often sell out long before the demand dries up. At this point several A319s are already being offloaded to a niche carrier in Oceania and a US ULCC.

*Nicholas Arson starts tuning up*

In the market for significantly more capacity and recognising the inherent flaws in the 156 pax A319s, U2 management visit Airbus and actually ask why they weren't encouraged to take up A320s in the first place. If you're wondering what that looked like I can sum up the reaction of the assembled good folk of Airbus thus:

Image

And then they order A320 (and a handful of A321). Hundreds of people who dealt with the last order have the Hives stuck in their head for the next week. U2 love their new toys and even help with the development of neo variants, just not the A319.
A million great ideas...
 

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