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Tuesday Trivia: IATA/ICAO Codes On Tails

All about Airlines and Airliners.
 

ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 05 Oct 21, 20:12Post
How many airlines have tail logos that include their IATA or ICAO codes? Current or historic airlines or liveries.

Here's an obvious one to kick things off:



Have at it :)
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShyFlyer (Founding Member) 05 Oct 21, 22:27Post
My nomination is S7:



It was the first airline that came to mind. Not only is their IATA code prominently displayed, it's also their trade name (full name is JSC Siberia Airlines).
Let's go Brandon
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 10:07Post






And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
mhodgson (ATC & Photo Quality Screener & Founding Member) 06 Oct 21, 10:16Post
LTU




KLM


Portugalia


Also Hapag-Lloyd Express (not my photo)


A few cheeky ones I've found where the three letters on their tail weren't ICAO/IATA - dba, bmi, LGW
There's the right way, the wrong way and the railway.
mhodgson (ATC & Photo Quality Screener & Founding Member) 06 Oct 21, 10:18Post
And how could I forget:
There's the right way, the wrong way and the railway.
mhodgson (ATC & Photo Quality Screener & Founding Member) 06 Oct 21, 10:24Post
Finally for now:





And although I mentioned bmi as not actually being their IATA code, their British Midland guise did use the BM logo which was their ICAO code.



I think Iberia also qualify

There's the right way, the wrong way and the railway.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 11:20Post
Many more historical ones than I imagined!

mhodgson wrote:And although I mentioned bmi as not actually being their IATA code, their British Midland guise did use the BM logo which was their ICAO code.

Funny, I dismissed that livery, assuming that they'd been BD all along.

mhodgson wrote:I think Iberia also qualify



Absolutely, that's one of the ones I had in mind when starting the thread {thumbsup} Here's another somewhat-disguised one:

Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
mhodgson (ATC & Photo Quality Screener & Founding Member) 06 Oct 21, 11:36Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:Many more historical ones than I imagined!

mhodgson wrote:And although I mentioned bmi as not actually being their IATA code, their British Midland guise did use the BM logo which was their ICAO code.

Funny, I dismissed that livery, assuming that they'd been BD all along.


Just in case they were BD throughout (I think you may be right!) I'll claim the diamond represents the A from their IATA code :))
There's the right way, the wrong way and the railway.
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 11:45Post
And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 12:47Post
miamiair wrote:

That's even more disguised! Also from the Portuguese-speaking world:

Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 13:10Post
And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 13:23Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:How many airlines have tail logos that include their IATA or ICAO codes? Current or historic airlines or liveries.

Have at it :)


Great idea for a thread, BTW!
And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 16:49Post
miamiair wrote:Great idea for a thread, BTW!

Since you're so nice, I'll allow that Avianca :))

We haven't even started on the freight birds yet.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 16:51Post
ShyFlyer wrote:My nomination is S7

Good call. Has to be one of the more obscure codes ever to make it onto a tail.

Oh, and before some wise-guy finds an old-school Aer Lingus with the reg on the fin: No. 8)
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
airtrainer 06 Oct 21, 21:34Post
Some more...



Grounded...
airtrainer 06 Oct 21, 21:38Post
Grounded...
airtrainer 06 Oct 21, 21:48Post



Grounded...
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 06 Oct 21, 22:31Post
airtrainer wrote:

That one counts {thumbsup}

XL and the Kelowna look like they should count, but their IATA codes are JN and KW respectively, so no dice.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 07 Oct 21, 08:56Post












And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
Paul Chandler1 13 Oct 21, 19:24Post


Slightly obscure but MEA callsign is Cedar (as in the tree)
 

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