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Sriwijaya Air 735 Down Near Jakarta

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JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 09 Jan 21, 11:21Post
This one doesn't look good. Sriwijaya Air flight SJ182 operated by PK-CLC, a former CO / UA 735 , lost radar contact over Jakarta Bay. Local fishing crews are already reporting debris.
A million great ideas...
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 09 Jan 21, 11:55Post
For what it's worth, FR24 data shows a steady climb at 287kt tailing off to 115kt in well under than a minute, followed by a sharp turn to the right and a rapid descent. (Yes, that's groundspeed, but should be a reasonable indication of what was happening to the airspeed.)

SJY182.png
SJY182.png (308.68 KiB) Viewed 639 times
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 09 Jan 21, 21:28Post
What happened to the speed around the 8000ft mark, is that standard throttling back? The descent must have been horrific {vsad}

There were 62 people onboard, it seems unlikely any survived.
A million great ideas...
paul mcallister 10 Jan 21, 18:02Post
Flight recorders have been recovered, I believe the flight was delayed for around 30 mins due to very heavy rainstorm passing through.

I have not heard of any mayday call being made, and looking at FR24 tracking what ever went wrong, seems to have happened very quickly.
DXing 10 Jan 21, 21:52Post
I've found flight radar to be rather close but not exacting. That 8,000ft mark might be closer to 10 and that would be a place where ordinarily you might get a momentary level off an adjust from a take off climb to a cruise climb. That's in the U.S., Indonesia might be, and most likely is different.

What got me is the rate of descent. 22,912 fpm is a fantastic rate of descent. Pretty sure the ground speed is just that, the forward momentum of the airplane since that rate of descent translates into roughly 4 miles a minute or 240mph. In any case, it's high enough that to try and pull out of that dive would tax the hell out of the metal and I'm not sure that from anything less than 2 or 3 thousand feet you'd even be able to do that without severely damaging the aircraft in the process with even half that rate of descent.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 10 Jan 21, 22:23Post
From what little I've read, I understand a typical 737 stall speed to be in the region of 110kt with everything hanging out, more like 130-140kt clean.

No idea what winds aloft were like, but surface winds at the time were in the order of 6-8kt.

This crate lost 170kt in about half a minute, if the data's to be believed, ultimately reaching a groundspeed of 115kt. That has to be getting close to the stall, if not actually beyond it. Could that sharp right turn be explained by a spin entry?

At 07:36 you see the rate of climb fall off while the speed decreases, although this is groundspeed not airspeed so harder to draw conclusions. That said: Are we seeing pilot/autopilot hauling back on the stick to arrest a sudden sink due to windshear? Did they then drive it straight into an even meaner cell that did them in?
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
DXing 11 Jan 21, 02:48Post
As Paul mentioned the flight was delayed 30 minutes due to weather in the area but I have trouble believing that cleaned up, under climb thrust, they hit a downdraft so severe they couldn't power through it. It's possible but it would have to be a cell of immense size and strength which would have been like a giant red blob on their weather radar. It will be interesting to see what comes of the data recovered from the boxes. Hopefully between the instrument data and voice recorder the answer will become obvious.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 23 Jan 21, 21:25Post
From blancolirio:

Both recorder boxes recovered, but the memory from the CVR is still missing.

Media reports suggest that the investigation is focusing on the autothrottles - no official confirmation.

Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 10 Feb 21, 16:26Post
Preliminary report is out:

http://knkt.dephub.go.id/knkt/ntsc_avia ... Report.pdf
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 10 Feb 21, 19:01Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:Preliminary report is out:

http://knkt.dephub.go.id/knkt/ntsc_avia ... Report.pdf


Well that looks wholly preventable. Well over a minute of the left engine throttling back before they realised anything was wrong? How does that happen?
A million great ideas...
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 31 Mar 21, 11:44Post
CVR found.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-56585732
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
JLAmber (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 08 Apr 21, 21:38Post
I'm amazed they found the CVR after so long and buried so deep in mud. You could easily lose a car in that depth and never see it again.
A million great ideas...
 

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