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Coronavirus: Civil Aviation Impact

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ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 28 Jan 20, 20:26Post
AY suspends Daxing, Nanjing

Finland's national airline Finnair announced on Tuesday the firm is temporarily suspending routes to Nanjing and Beijing Daxing, China until the end of March.

The company said the reason for the break was due to China's ban on group travel from the country, prompted by the outbreak of the new coronavirus, a contagious disease which has killed at least 106 people in China and infected more than 4,500 others.

Finnair flights to Beijing Daxing will be suspended from 5 February through 29 March and the airline will temporarily cancel its Nanjing route between 8 Feburary to 29 March. Finnair normally shuttles passengers to Beijing Daxing three times a week and to Nanjing twice each week.

Read more: https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/finn ... s/11180340
Last edited by miamiair on 05 Feb 20, 15:35, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Thread title changed
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 28 Jan 20, 20:44Post
UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office updated travel advice for China:

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to Hubei Province due to the ongoing novel coronavirus outbreak. If you’re in this area and able to leave, you should do so.

The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the rest of mainland China (not including Hong Kong and Macao). The Chinese government continue to impose further restrictions on movement within China in response to the coronavirus outbreak. It may become harder over the coming weeks for those who wish to leave China to do so. If you feel that you may want to leave China soon, you should consider making plans to do so before any further restrictions may be imposed.

Full advice: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/china

It'll be interesting to see how this develops from an airline traffic point of view.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
airtrainer 28 Jan 20, 21:48Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:It'll be interesting to see how this develops from an airline traffic point of view.


From what I read, Air India is planning to send a 747 in Wuhan to evacuate Indian citizens.
Grounded...
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 28 Jan 20, 22:48Post
The USA chartered a Kalitta 744 to evacuate US citizens from Wuhan. N705CK is enroute WUH to ANC as we speak.



Germany is also considering to evacuate its citizens from Wuhan. But with the efficient decisionmaking here these days, that flight will probably be able to land at BER. {bored}
Yes, the new EU copyright directive is that stupid.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 29 Jan 20, 09:40Post
BA suspends all mainland China flights "with immediate effect", currently only till 31st January while it assesses the situation:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-51292590
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 29 Jan 20, 17:01Post
Zak wrote:Germany is also considering to evacuate its citizens from Wuhan. But with the efficient decisionmaking here these days, that flight will probably be able to land at BER. {bored}

Do they still have the Ebola bird?
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 29 Jan 20, 18:07Post
LH suspends all China mainland flights until at least Feb 9th.
Yes, the new EU copyright directive is that stupid.
airtrainer 29 Jan 20, 20:20Post
ANA will also charter a plane to evacuate japanese citizens.
Grounded...
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 30 Jan 20, 11:39Post
https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/main ... h/11184091

No announcement yet, but Finnair has apparently now pulled all mainland China flights for the next two months. That will hurt them, bad.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
miamiair (netAirspace FAA) 30 Jan 20, 17:54Post
HiFly is sending two A340s and the A380 to repatriate people.
And let's get one thing straight. There's a big difference between a pilot and an aviator. One is a technician; the other is an artist in love with flight. — E. B. Jeppesen
airtrainer 30 Jan 20, 21:38Post
Well...

Passengers on a China Southern flight between Nagoya [and] Shanghai refused to board when they realized many of their fellow passengers were from Wuhan, the epicentre of the latest virus du jour.
According to a report in the International Business Times, some passengers on one of China Southern’s two daily flights between the cities recognized Wuhan accents among other passengers and became antagonistic towards them.

Link
Grounded...
paul mcallister 30 Jan 20, 22:18Post
This will also have major implications for goods manufactured and imported from China I would think.
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 31 Jan 20, 09:24Post
paul mcallister wrote:This will also have major implications for goods manufactured and imported from China I would think.

It will have an impact for sure. How big it will be remains to be seen.

This situation escalated during the week of Chinese New Year, when all factories and offices in China are closed anyway. China already extended the holidays until Sunday, to gain more time to deal with the situation.

After Chinese New Year, European and US markets usually see a huge peak in imports from China. That will probably not happen this year.

How big the dent in Chinese exports will be depends on how quickly things will return to normal. The Chinese leadership appears extremely determined to show their own population and the world how they are capable of dealing with the outbreak situation. Certainly in part an overcompensation for their shortcomings in dealing with the SARS outbreak some 15 years ago.

In general, decisive action is not the worst idea in an outbreak scenario. However, from what we know so far, this new Corona virus seems to have a mortality rate well below that of the common flu. The patients that have been tested positive on Corona here in Germany briefly showed symptoms of a flu and then made a full recovery within a matter of days, without any special medication or treatment.

As one hospital doctor put it: "Their greatest issue right now is fighting boredom while waiting to be released from quarantine."

I'm not a doctor and I won't criticize anybody for playing things safe. But we certainly do pay a high price to fight a virus that appears to be highly infectious, but not extremely lethal.
Yes, the new EU copyright directive is that stupid.
DXing 01 Feb 20, 02:21Post
The U.S. government today imposed severe restrictions on persons who want to enter the country who have traveled in China.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/us-declares-coronavirus-public-health-emergency-after-imposing-quarantines/ar-BBZwYiL?ocid=ientp

The Trump administration, while insisting the risk to Americans from coronavirus is low, nevertheless declared a public health emergency on Friday and announced the extraordinary step of barring entry to the United States of foreign nationals who have traveled to China.

In addition, starting on Sunday U.S. citizens who have traveled within the past two weeks to China's Hubei Province - epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic - will be subject to a mandatory quarantine of 14 days: the incubation period of the virus, officials said
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 01 Feb 20, 12:20Post
So are US citizens somehow immune to it in the rest of China? Seems like an odd way of doing things.
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
DXing 01 Feb 20, 18:25Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:So are US citizens somehow immune to it in the rest of China? Seems like an odd way of doing things.


I believe that U.S. citizens that traveled to other parts of China will be screened upon arrival and will have to sign some sort of document that says they agree to 2 weeks of self monitoring at home. Those quarantined will be kept in isolation facilities approved by the government. It's a nuance but it effectively keeps health care facilities free up to handle other more mundane things.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 05 Feb 20, 13:17Post
CX asks staff to take 3 weeks' unpaid leave:

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-51383284
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
DXing 05 Feb 20, 14:35Post
Both American and United have decided to suspend service to HKG starting at different dates and extending to February 20th. Weak demand was cited as the reason. United was already suspending service

https://apnews.com/b86cf47fd9a8e2d9642abe300ea640c1
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 17 Feb 20, 08:17Post
Yup, this is hurting Finnair all right.

Finland’s state-owned airline Finnair has cancelled all flights to mainland China until 28 March because of the novel coronavirus outbreak in the Asian country.

https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/finn ... s/11208811

Finnair is beginning co-determination talks with 700 long-haul pilots due to the coronavirus situation. The national airline has cancelled all of its roughly 200 flights to and from China through the end of March.

The negotiations, which begin next week, are aimed at gauging the need for temporary layoffs.

"We're preparing for a prolongation of this situation. Negotiations start next week and will include discussion of possible temporary furloughs," says Finnair's media relations director Päivyt Tallqvist.

https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/finn ... s/11206754
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
ShanwickOceanic (netAirspace FAA) 12 Mar 20, 17:44Post
As my inbox fills with cancelled meetings right left and centre, and we're asked to consider working from home if at all possible, I wonder whether there will be longer-term effects on aviation that drag on well past the end of the quarantine measures.

Sure, we've been able to do videoconferencing (fairly) easily for years, but we've never had to. As time drags on and we get used to it, and especially with the likely economic impact of these measures squeezing budgets the world over, do you think there'll be a significant number of people who realise they don't actually need to fly?
Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast:
For it is the number of a man; and its number is One hundred threescore and twelve.
DXing 13 Mar 20, 04:19Post
Double post
Last edited by DXing on 13 Mar 20, 04:41, edited 1 time in total.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
DXing 13 Mar 20, 04:20Post
No. Business still requires face time as well as wining, dining, and schmoozing. Video conferences just can't compete with that.
What's the point of an open door policy if inside the open door sits a closed mind?
ANCFlyer (netAirspace ATC & Founding Member) 13 Mar 20, 22:35Post
Well, Delta just shitcanned 40% of their flights, and intend to park 300 planes, if ABC7 can be believed. AS, UA, AA all reduced capacity.
Armor. M60A1, M60A3, M1, M1A1, Master Gunner, CSM - Best Job I Ever Had
IFEMaster (Project Dark Overlord & Founding Member) 13 Mar 20, 23:38Post
ShanwickOceanic wrote:As my inbox fills with cancelled meetings right left and centre, and we're asked to consider working from home if at all possible, I wonder whether there will be longer-term effects on aviation that drag on well past the end of the quarantine measures.

Sure, we've been able to do videoconferencing (fairly) easily for years, but we've never had to. As time drags on and we get used to it, and especially with the likely economic impact of these measures squeezing budgets the world over, do you think there'll be a significant number of people who realise they don't actually need to fly?


Yes. My company are now mandatory WFH, and two things I've learned quickly:

- You know that saying "this meeting should have been an email"? Very true. There's a ton of meetings that are quite successfully being replaced with an email thread or two.
- Jobs that were once declared as "not possible to be done remotely" can, in fact, be done remotely.

I expect to not spend even 50% of my travel budget this year now.
"Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds." - Albert Einstein
Zak (netAirspace FAA) 14 Mar 20, 15:01Post
IFEMaster wrote:I expect to not spend even 50% of my travel budget this year now.

Same here. 90% of my travels take me to the US these days, which is not an option right now. I will probably postpone my trips to September, and see if I can do ORD, LAX, IAH and MIA all in 1 trip.

If my company still exists by then, that is... {boxed}
Yes, the new EU copyright directive is that stupid.
 

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